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(There are 180 articles in the database.)

From: Irish Political Review: Editorials
Date: June, 2010
By: Editorial
Title: The Imperial Elections
The British Election, which is also held in the North even though it can play no real part in it, sometimes throws up some things of interest, despite its essential irrelevance. It was suggested that this time it would really be part of the British Election. The Irish Times, which never admitted that the British Election in the North was bogus—and was praised by Martin Mansergh for never allowing our view of Northern affairs to be expressed in it—suddenly suggested that this time it would not be bogus, but would be about the real issues of British government. But of course it wasn't. The famous 'bread and butter' issue made no more than a token appearance. All the parties stood for more bread and butter.

Reg Empey's Unionist Party, even though it pretended to have become part of the Tory Party, did not advocate cuts in the supply of bread and butter. Empey's selling point was that, if he was returned with a little flock of MPs, he would use his influence to prevent party policy being applied to the North. He did not win a single seat—not even his own. He lost the only seat he used to have, Lady Hermon's in North Down. Lady Hermon held the seat, but left the Unionist Party when it attached itself to the Tories because she agreed with the policies and general outlook of Labour.

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From: Irish Political Review: Editorials
Date: May, 2010
By: Editorial
Title: Existential Crises
The Irish body politic is broken—so says the Irish Times, taking the wish for the deed.

"We are not the citizens any more of a vibrant, confident state, but of a broken polity. We are no longer the masters we believed ourselves to be of our own fates, but hapless players of hands dealt us by others, by huge uncontrollable forces beyond our understanding. Old attachments and certainties to and about institutions like Church and State, to which our parents clung with what now seems naive optimism, and which to a great extent defined their sense of identity for good and ill, were castles built on sand…" (St. Patrick's Day)


What has changed in political life in recent years to warrant all of this?

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From: Irish Political Review: Editorials
Date: April, 2010
By: Editorial
Title: Ireland: The State We're In
Cowen came to power in Ireland with an agenda of restoring the autonomy of the state, notably by freeing it from social restraints to enable it re-shape the economy as it saw fit. But it was a different agenda from that espoused by Labour Party statesman Ruairí Quinn, who last year, at the "Lemass International Forum", in a curious metaphor attacked the "blancmange where the slowest carrying caravan on the tail of social partnership is the one that's leading the speed of change" and who had previously denounced the "cloying effects of social partnership".

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From: Irish Political Review: Editorials
Date: April, 2010
By: Editorial
Title: Brother England & Gallipoli
Fianna Fail Minister, Martin Mansergh, has decreed that England is not a foreign country. He has not denied that all the other countries in the world other than England are foreign. He might have denied it on the grounds that the very notion of foreign countries is alien to the universalist ideology of the United Nations. He has not, as far as we know, denied that European countries are foreign countries. It is only England that is not a foreign country. The celebration of England's wars, which Ireland has been indulging in recently, follows naturally enough from this view. If England is not a foreign country then its wars are Our Wars too.

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From: Irish Foreign Affairs: Editorials
Date: April, 2010
By: Editorial
Title: Nuclear Disarmament
There is talk of nuclear disarmament again. It is the Great Powers who are talking about it. When Powers that are Great by virtue of their armaments talk about disarmament we can be sure that it is with evil intent. Somebody is being fooled so that something dire can be done to somebody else. In the present instance we are being gulled into a state of mind which would enable us to look with moral complacency on an attack on Iran—even a nuclear one.

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